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Philadelphia gun violence: Two dead and nine injured following five separate shootings on Friday, police say


Two people were killed and nine were injured in five separate shootings across Philadelphia on Friday, police said.

The violence started shortly after noon, when police said a 6-year-old boy was grazed in the arm by a bullet while sitting in a car on the 1600 block of West Glenwood Avenue in North Philadelphia, NBC10 reported. He was brought to St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children.

Then, at 5 p.m. police said three people were injured in a shooting on the 900 block of West Girard Avenue in North Philadelphia, including a 75-year-old man, FOX29 reported.

He was shot three times in the left arm and was taken to Jefferson Hospital.

Two other men, a 25-year-old and a 31-year-old, were also hit and driven to Temple University Hospital by police. The older man was placed in critical condition.

Just 15 minutes later, authorities said a man in his mid-20s was shot in the head while sitting in a running double-parked vehicle on the 6200 block of Limekiln Pike in Ogontz, 6ABC reported.

He tried to drive away after he was shot, but ended up crashing. The man was rushed to Einstein Medical Center where he later died.

Then, around 7:30 p.m. police said four people between the ages of 29 and 34 were hit in a drive-by shooting on the 5300 block of Charles Street in Wissinoming, FOX29 reported.

Three people, two men and a woman, were rushed to Frankford-Torresdale Hospital in critical condition. A 33-year-old man who was shot twice in the thigh was driven to Temple University Hospital.

Police found a man and a woman with gunshot wounds on the 2600 block of North Bouvier Street in North Philadelphia around 10:30 p.m., 6ABC reported.

They were both transported to a hospital where one man died from his injuries and another is still being treated, authorities said.

No arrests had been made in any of these cases as of Saturday morning. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 215-686-TIPS.



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